Tag Archives: special needs

Running Shoes. Just click your heels twice.

heart on top l final 2 two shoes one mission

Alright, I’ll give it to you straight, I have spent the last couple of hours emptying my heart onto this page, split it wide open, raw, maybe too raw. So I proofed it, questioned it, changed it, proofed it again and it just doesn’t feel like its ready to be shared. What I will share with you is the last couple of paragraphs…

“Later that night I laced up. I knew that the one thing that would smooth my edges would be to put on my running shoes and just work it out, physically, just let it all go.

My running shoes have come to represent so much for me. It doesn’t matter if I walk in them or run in them, heck I can just put them on and they change how I feel.

They offer me a moment to myself, a moment where I don’t have to explain, or share… just be. The only fight is between me and myself. Nothing to prove. I can cry if I want to and blame my teary eyes on the wind 😉 

I can just run it out.

When I won my first pair of running shoes it was as if I was holding Dorothy’s red slippers. A feeling like that is to be shared, duplicated, given…to others.

I have no doubt that every time a Mom laces up a pair of running shoes they will feel the magic that they hold. What a beautiful way to not only help, but to empower.”

I believe in Heart Strides. I hope you will to. Please follow the links below to find out how you can help support our efforts, help moms lace up for life.

https://www.bonfirefunds.com/heart-stride-two-shoes-one-mission

https://fundly.com/running-shoes-for-moms

Follow us on FB-

https://www.facebook.com/heartstrides

 

Z first look at CO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friends, they’re a big deal.

I have been wanting to write this post since the day it happened and here I am months later finally putting it out there. I have been thinking about all of the amazing women that I know and how grateful I am to have them in my life. They are always teaching me about who I am, who I am not and who I am yet to be.

I have realized how important they have become since Logan’s diagnosis and how some friends have drifted away and how new ones have emerged. Everyone’s timing always perfect.

If I could, I would post a photo of each and everyone of you, all of the amazing women in my life that have supported me through the good, the bad and the ugly. There is just not enough space to do that so I’m choosing a more recent photo with new friends because it reminds me of what all of my friends have in common. Compassion, love and generosity.

I was a new addition to this dynamic duo of women, they had warmly welcomed me into their already well established friendship after we moved from Wisconsin to Colorado.

Image0522On this day we were headed out for a hike and I was excited to explore new territory. As we were approaching the mountain trail I realized that the bars on my phone were disappearing and without mention, they picked up on my anxiousness and Shana quickly said, “Oh, don’t worry, we can go somewhere else, you’ll need your phone for when the school calls with Logan’s numbers“.

I hesitated, hating to change our plans. I knew that neither of them would mind, but I didn’t want to be the reason for a change our plans. Well, actually I didn’t want T1D to be the reason for it. It was just another gentle reminder that T1D is ALWAYS there and I was struggling with it a little bit, feeling restricted, and feeling selfish at the same time.

We drove back down the mountain to a different spot, both of them telling me not to worry about it, that it was no big deal, but it was a big deal. It may seem like such a small thing, but in my mind all of these small things add up and make me feel so incredibly lucky to have people like these two women in my life. We all deserve friends like this and I trust that you have them.

Often times people say, ‘Really, it’s not a big deal‘ and make changes to help out. Friends do this for each other. But you must know that it is a big deal and it doesn’t go unnoticed. We are so grateful for all of the things that you do.

For example, all of the times that people have changed a meal time so we could work around Logan’s T1D schedule. Or when his teachers figure out a way to include a treat during a time that Logan would typically have  snack so that he doesn’t have to bring his treat home or get an extra injection.  Or when people ask questions about T1D and are genuinely curious about what it is and how they can better understand it. Or the many times that my friends cut me some slack when they know I’ve had a sleepless night. Or, or, or. The list is long, but these are all the ‘little’ things that are big things in our book and there are so many.

We could never ask that you make these changes because we understand that everyone has needs and that everything always works out. Believe me, we always manage. Well I take that back. If we know you well enough, we might ask you, and if you’ve been reading my blog you already know that sometimes T1D just plain ole’ sucks. So I’m not trying to say that life is all rainbows and sunshine, what I am saying is that it is all good. Really.

And the asking for help part, ugh. I am forever telling my children to ask for help, yet I am the worst, I find it quite difficult to ask. I mean really, who doesn’t?

So, we might not ask, and we will not expect, but what we will do is to be grateful for every token of kindness that you offer. We will also be inspired to offer that kindness to someone else and make sure that we are the one’s that tell them, “Really, it’s no big deal“.

For me, among many things, T1D challenges my natural instinct to be spontaneous. My forever desire to just pick up and go, just do it, right now. I’ve gotten much better about it and have helped Logan manage his own desires to be spontaneous, it just takes a lot of planning, and it helps to be surrounded by people that will come off of the mountain for you when you need phone service.

As we celebrate Mothers Day I would also like to celebrate friends. We all believe that our friends are the best friends and they are, aren’t they? May you continue to have a friend at your side and to be that friend for someone else.

Sending out love and gratitude to all of the friends that have been a part of my life, and for those I am yet to meet. An extra shout out to my Iola friends, you know who you are, a community of women that should be honored with their own post. There is a lot of magic happening in central Wisconsin.

A special thank you to the friends in Logan’s life that have been so special to him along the way and who have always been so supportive of his T1D care. Thank you for stopping for BG checks in the middle of some serious play time, for not sharing food after your parents did everything in their power to teach you to share, and for understanding how unpredictable T1D can be, you guys are troopers. Hugs to Maddy, Lilly, Maddie, Nina and Tobin, thank you, I know that Logan misses your company.  (I am sure to have forgotten a few and I know that Logan would have more to add to this list if he were here to join in the conversation).

School Days

Lgoan's first day of schoolI came across this photo the other day while looking through an old file marked “diabetes stuff”. It is a picture of Logan’s first day of school, only about a month after his T1D diagnosis. He was a little under three and a half years old. It made me realize how far we have come as a family and it also made me think “Was he really that little when he was diagnosed?”

It’s not the beginning of a school year, but it’s always a good time to revisit resources that provide helpful information to make the transition to school easier when it comes. It’s also a good time to think about how things are going in the current year and if there is anything that needs to be addressed.

We have had different experiences every start of a school year, not one has been the same so we continue to learn and adjust as we go along. All schools are different, and all children are different so there isn’t one best way to approach it, though I would say that diplomacy can be a good skill to have.

D-Mom’s are different too, and sometimes it’s hard not to let our emotions get the best of us when we are feeling frustrated in the middle of a 504 meeting or when we are butting heads with a faculty or staff member. (A side note- I was in the middle of getting my Special Ed teaching license prior to moving to Colorado. I have been on both sides of the fence and every situation is unique, in which I believe they should be treated that way. I write this entry from the perspective of me, the parent, the mom…the Mama Bear ;)).

This reminds me of a time when we were feeling challenged by a school situation. It was a combination of things and we were trying to sift through them to figure out which one should be addressed first, though the lack of regard for the seriousness of T1D was at the top of our list. Let it be known that it wasn’t everyone that we encountered at school that felt this way, only a few, but sometimes it only takes a few.

On the morning of the first day of school, we took Logan’s supplies in, and sent him on his way. Later that day we had to stop by with some paperwork and we found Logan in the hallway, all by himself. We asked him where he was going and he seemed a little confused. At first I thought it was because of his new schedule, but then I realized that it was his blood sugar. We took him into the health room and he was 42! Talk about emotional, I was irate. I looked at my husband and said through a clenched smile, “You’ll have to be the one to talk to someone about this because I am so mad that it will be completely unproductive“.

After getting Logan’s blood sugar back in range and getting him back to class, my husband talked with the staff. There had been some confusion as to when and who was going to check Logan’s blood sugar. I truly believe that it was never intentional, but it did not stop me from being angry. I don’t like to be angry, it doesn’t feel good and nothing is ever resolved. So instead of being angry I became even more diligent in making sure that everyone knew exactly when and where Logan would have his blood sugar checked, mind you that is why we have the 504 meeting, to make sure everyone knows what is going on and who is responsible for his care. It is a legal document.

We have experienced all types of scenarios in a school environment, what we have learned over and over is not to let your emotions get in the way and to make sure the roads of communication are open and working. It takes everyone’s involvement and active participation to make sure all goes as planned, and if doesn’t go as planned, then to know what to do in that scenario as well.

Both the JDRF and the ADA websites have some wonderful resources and tips on working with your child’s school. Every situation will be different, you will be able to take the information and apply it to your own personal situation.

We have experienced situations in school where the staff is very open about us advocating and have allowed Logan talk to his classmates about T1D and then we’ve had situations where the school preferred that we didn’t share the information. However it may work out for you and your family, always trust that the right people will be there to help you along the way, and most of the time, they are the ones that you would least suspect.

http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=103461

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/parents-and-kids/diabetes-care-at-school/